Woody Tasch - Opening Keynote to the Slow Money 4th National Gathering

 
Published on May 7, 2013
 
Our fate is in the hands of experts. Our fate is in the hands of technologists. Our fate is in the hands of fundamentalists, by which I mean not only religious fundamentalists, but free market fundamentalists as well. Surely our fate is in the hands of military industrialists, even more than it was when President Eisenhower issued his prescient warning after World War II. 
 
And, our fate is in the hands of fiduciaries. 
 
But if it is true that our fate is in all those hands, it is also true that we hold the seeds of a different future in our own hands.
 
It's a future toward which the phrases slow money and nurture capital point. It's a future that will have fewer industrial farmers who only spend 45 minutes per year on each acre of their land. That's right—the typical large-scale industrial corn and soybean farmer spends only 45 minutes per year on each acre of his land. What shall we call that? Efficient agriculture? Fast agriculture?
 
Phrases like fast agriculture and slow money and nurture capital and innate value, and maybe even heroic grunt, begin to give us the vocabulary we need for our new conversation.
 
In this spirit, in the spirit of not only seeking a new kind of accounting but also of looking for new language, I would like to offer a new term.
 
I want us to get down into the linguistic soil and get our hands dirty. And I want us to have some fun, since economics is such a dismally dull science and humor a much-needed antidote.
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